Course Description

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyze literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.

Unit Titles and DescriptionsTime Allocated
Poetry

Students will read a wide variety of poems and look at the techniques that poets use including poetic devices such as metaphor, verbs, similes, apostrophes, stanza length, powerful language, and how poets engage the readers’ senses. Students will write their own poems, they will hear poems read, and they will gain awareness of what makes effective delivery. Students will complete three polished writing assignments in this unit, search for inspiring poetry performances online and make a video of their own spoken poetry.

25 hours
Shakespeare

In this unit students will read Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, exploring the eternally relevant themes of militarism, personal conflict, ambition, and pride. Assignments include one that deals with imagery in the play, a speaking assignment giving advice to the characters, an assignment about irony, and a unit culminating essay.

30 hours
Short Stories

Students are invited to read widely and explore the varied selection of stories provided. Three writing assignments will be completed on the stories chosen.

23 hours
Novel Study

Students will read William Bell’s novel, Stones.  In doing so, they will explore themes such as gender inequality, racism, local history, and maturation.  Students will also produce several pieces of writing, one of which is a formal essay in which they will provide quotations from the text, properly cited in the body of the essay as well as at the end in a Works Cited page.

30 hours
Final Assessments
Exam

This is a proctored exam worth 30% of your final grade.

2 hours
Total110 hours

Resources provided by the Institute of Canadian Education:

  • Supplemental reading and animations.

Overall Curriculum Expectations

A. Oral Communication
A1Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes;
A2Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
A3Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.
B. Reading and Literature Studies
B1Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, informational, and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
B2Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate an understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
B3Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
B4Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.
C. Writing
C1Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience;
C2Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of literary, informational, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
C3Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively;
C4Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
D. Media Studies
D1Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
D2Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;
D3Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;
D4Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.

 

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

English 2D acquaints students with a full version of a Shakespearean play as well as with a Canadian novel, both of which deal with themes that have to do with power and human error. With such themes in mind, students write their first formal essays on literature, analyze selected poems and short stories, and create their own oral presentations on topics approved by their teachers.

  • ICE demonstrations and videos pertaining to poetic devices enable students to proceed with work on the poetry unit.
  • Analysis of poetic styles is conducted through a variety of subjects.
  • A pdf on Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar is accompanied by an animation that allows students to deal with Elizabethan English and the play’s concepts.
  • Scaffolding at various stages in the study of the play gives students practice in writing about Shakespeare’s plays.
  • Pdfs of short stories focus on the elements of fiction.
  • Reflecting on and writing about diverse media and various genres allows students to develop their unique insights into literature.

Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting Strategies of Student Performance:

Our theory of assessment and evaluation follows the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success document, and it is our firm belief that doing so is in the best interests of students. We seek to design assessments in such a way as to make it possible to gather and show evidence of learning in a variety of ways to gradually release responsibility to the students and to give multiple and varied opportunities to reflect on learning and receive detailed feedback.

Growing Success articulates the vision the Ministry has for the purpose and structure of assessment and evaluation techniques. There are seven fundamental principles that ensure best practices and procedures of assessment and evaluation by ICE teachers. ICE assessments and evaluations,

  • are fair, transparent, and equitable for all students;
  • support all students, including those with special education needs, those who are learning the language of instruction (English or French), and those who are First Nation, Métis, or Inuit;
  • are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals and, as much as possible, to the interests, learning styles and preferences, needs, and experiences of all students;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other points throughout the school year or course;
  • are ongoing, varied in nature, and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful, and timely to support improved learning and achievement;
  • develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals, and plan the next steps for their learning.

The Final Grade:

The evaluation for this course is based on the student’s achievement of curriculum expectations and the demonstrated skills required for effective learning. The final percentage grade represents the quality of the student’s overall achievement of the expectations for the course and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline. A credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • 30% of the grade will be based on final evaluations administered at the end of the course. The final assessment may be a final exam, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.

The Report Card:

Student achievement will be communicated formally to students via an official report card. Report cards are issued at the midterm point in the course, as well as upon completion of the course. Each report card will focus on two distinct, but related aspects of student achievement. First, the achievement of curriculum expectations is reported as a percentage grade. Additionally, the course median is reported as a percentage. The teacher will also provide written comments concerning the student’s strengths, areas for improvement, and next steps. Second, the learning skills are reported as a letter grade, representing one of four levels of accomplishment. The report card also indicates whether an OSSD credit has been earned. Upon completion of a course, ICE will send a copy of the report card back to the student’s home school (if in Ontario) where the course will be added to the ongoing list of courses on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. The report card will also be sent to the student’s home address.

Program Planning Considerations:

Teachers who are planning a program in this subject will make an effort to take into account considerations for program planning that aligns with the Ontario Ministry of Education policy and initiatives in a number of important areas.

Course Curriculum

POETRY
ENG2D Poetry – Analysis Organizer 00:00:00
ENG2D Poetry – Assignment One10, 00:00
ENG2D Poetry – Assignment Two10, 00:00
ENG2D POETRY – Poetry Reading and Analyzing 00:00:00
ENG2D POETRY – Poetic Device Examples 00:00:00
ENG2D Poetry – Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.docx 00:00:00
ENG2D Poetry – Assignment One10, 00:00
ENG2D Poetry – Assignment Two10, 00:00
JULIUS CAESAR
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Caesar Journals 1-5 00:00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment One10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Two10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Three10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Four10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Elements of DramaNotes 00:00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment One10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Two10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Three10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Four10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Julius Caesar Background Notes 00:00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment One10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Two10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Three10, 00:00
ENG2D Julius Caesar – Assignment Four10, 00:00
SHORT STORIES
ENG2D Short Stories – SS-Character 00:00:00
ENG2D_Short_Stories_Assingment_two10, 00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Assingment One10, 00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – SS-Intro 00:00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Assingment One10, 00:00
ENG2D_Short_Stories_Assingment_two10, 00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Full text version of the Veldt 00:00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Assingment One10, 00:00
ENG2D_Short_Stories_Assingment_two10, 00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Gentlemen your verdict 00:00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Assingment One10, 00:00
ENG2D_Short_Stories_Assingment_two10, 00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Short Stories.ppt 00:00:00
ENG2D Short Stories – Assingment One10, 00:00
ENG2D_Short_Stories_Assingment_two10, 00:00
Novel Study
ENG2D Novel Study-To Kill A Mockingbird – SEEC vs SLEEEC Paragraph 00:00:00
ENG2D FINAL ISU – To Kill a Mockingbird Scrapbook10, 00:00
ENG2D Novel Study-To Kill A Mockingbird – SLEEEC Paragraph Example 00:00:00
ENG2D FINAL ISU – To Kill a Mockingbird Scrapbook10, 00:00
ENG2D Novel Study- To kill a Mockingbird-Full Text 00:00:00
ENG2D Novel Study- To kill a Mockingbird Study Notes 00:00:00
A1 To kill a Mockingbird Activity 110, 00:00
A2 To kill a Mockingbird Essay10, 00:00
A3 To kill a Mockingbird Scrapbook10, 00:00
Quiz 1- To kill a Mockingbird 02:00:00
Quiz 2- To kill a Mockingbird 02:00:00
Quiz 3- To kill a Mockingbird 02:00:00
33 STUDENTS ENROLLED

Institute of Canadian Education (ICE), Toronto.

Head Quarters (Toronto)
140 La Rose Ave #201, Etobicoke, ON M9P 1B2
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