Course Description

This course is designed to develop the key oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will read, interpret, and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on identifying and using appropriate strategies and processes to improve students’ comprehension of texts and to help them communicate clearly and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 applied English course, which leads to college, or workplace preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12.

Unit Titles and DescriptionsTime Allocated
Media and the Environment

This unit will look at the connection between the media and current environmental issues. Students will explore the elements of advertising and how they can be used to influence people to play an active role in protecting the environment. Assignments in this unit include analyzing news articles, writing a news report, producing a podcast “rant”, and developing a plan to protect a newly discovered species.

26 hours
Poetic Forms and Voices

Students read and study a variety of poetic texts and learn to identify certain types of poems such as prose poems, limericks, concrete poems, found poems, lyrics and songs. Students also find, read and study examples of poetry and poetic language in the world around them. Students apply appropriate strategies to read, understand, and interpret poetic texts. They learn to understand the value of good sound devices in creating powerful poetry, and understand the appeals to the senses, and figurative language. During this unit, students demonstrate their understanding of poetry by writing Response Journals, explications of poems, and their own poetry; by participating in class activities; by presenting poems orally; by creating a media product; and by creating a Poetry Anthology.

 

27 hours
Narrative Forms and Voices 

Students develop an understanding of the conventions of narrative literature and language. Students read and study a range of short narratives, including short stories, narrative poetry, myths, legends, and animated films. Students use their knowledge of the elements of the narrative, such as plot, character, setting, conflict, theme, and atmosphere to understand and interpret narrative texts. Students record their thoughts, ideas, and feelings in a variety of personal and interactive responses, and by creating and sharing their own narratives. Students write descriptive and expository paragraphs, thereby providing a foundation for writing a five-paragraph essay. Ongoing personal reading and writing are essential for students to develop mature communication skills.

27 hours
Novel Study

Students will read and analyze John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men. Students will be given a historical overview of the Great Depression as it relates to the novel. Students will be asked to complete a pre-reading assignment where they will respond to a scenario and create their own journal entries. Students will complete quizzes for each chapter to test their basic knowledge of book. Students will study the various characters and characters throughout the novel creating their own short stories, poems. At the end of the unit, students will be given the opportunity to view the film for Of Mice and Men and write a film review while comparing it to the text.

30 hours
Final Assessment
Final Exam

This is a proctored exam worth 30% of your final grade.

2 hours
Total110 hours 

Resources required by the student:


All students registered for the online program will have access to all course content on the online course homepage 

Students registered for the in class program will be provided with all the resources required for the class 

Overall Curriculum Expectations

A. Oral Communication
A1Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes;
A2Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
A3Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.
B. Reading and Literature Studies
B1Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, informational, and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
B2Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
B3Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
B4Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.
C. Writing
C1Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience;
C2Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of literary, informational, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
C3Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively;
C4Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
D. Media Studies
D1Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
D2Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;
D3Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;
D4Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.

 

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

The over-riding aim of this course is to help students use the language of mathematics skillfully, confidently and flexibly, a wide variety of instructional strategies are used to provide learning opportunities to accommodate a variety of learning styles, interests and ability levels. The following mathematical processes will form the heart of the teaching and learning strategies used:

  • Communicating: This course offers students many opportunities to share their understanding both in oral as well as written form. Students will discuss concepts they have learned through discussion boards, write reports which relate concepts taught to real-world applications, and create presentations to demonstrate understanding of some concepts.
  • Problem solving: This course scaffolds student learning by building on prior knowledge and skills. Students will have the opportunity to review prior concepts and will be presented with problems that require them to apply their skills in new ways to solve problems related to real-world applications.
  • Reflecting: This course models the reflective process. Through the use of examples and practice exercises, the course demonstrates proper communication to explain intermediate steps and reflect on solutions to determine if they make sense in the given context.
  • Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies: This course models the use of graphing software to help solve problems and to familiarize students with technologies that can help make solving problems faster and more accurate.
  • Connecting: Students will connect the concepts taught in the course to real-world applications (e.g. concepts related to polynomial functions will be connected to applications in engineering). Students will have opportunities to connect previous concepts to new concepts through posed problems, investigations, and enrichment activities.
  • Self-Assessment: Through the use of interactive activities (e.g. multiple choice quizzes, and drag-and-drop activities) students receive instantaneous feedback and are able to self-assess their understanding of concepts.

Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting Strategies of Student Performance:

Our theory of assessment and evaluation follows the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success document, and it is our firm belief that doing so is in the best interests of students. We seek to design assessment in such a way as to make it possible to gather and show evidence of learning in a variety of ways to gradually release responsibility to the students, and to give multiple and varied opportunities to reflect on learning and receive detailed feedback.

Growing Success articulates the vision the Ministry has for the purpose and structure of assessment and evaluation techniques. There are seven fundamental principles that ensure best practices and procedures of assessment and evaluation by ICE teachers. ICE assessments and evaluations,

  • are fair, transparent, and equitable for all students;
  • support all students, including those with special education needs, those who are learning the language of instruction (English or French), and those who are First Nation, Métis, or Inuit;
  • are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals and, as much as possible, to the interests, learning styles and preferences, needs, and experiences of all students;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other points throughout the school year or course;
  • are ongoing, varied in nature, and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful, and timely to support improved learning and achievement;
  • develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals, and plan next steps for their learning.

The Final Grade:

The evaluation for this course is based on the student’s achievement of curriculum expectations and the demonstrated skills required for effective learning. The final percentage grade represents the quality of the student’s overall achievement of the expectations for the course and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline. A credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • 30% of the grade will be based on final evaluations administered at the end of the course. The final assessment may be a final exam, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.

The Report Card:

Student achievement will be communicated formally to students via an official report card. Report cards are issued at the midterm point in the course, as well as upon completion of the course. Each report card will focus on two distinct, but related aspects of student achievement. First, the achievement of curriculum expectations is reported as a percentage grade. Additionally, the course median is reported as a percentage. The teacher will also provide written comments concerning the student’s strengths, areas for improvement, and next steps. Second, the learning skills are reported as a letter grade, representing one of four levels of accomplishment. The report card also indicates whether an OSSD credit has been earned. Upon completion of a course, ICE will send a copy of the report card back to the student’s home school (if in Ontario) where the course will be added to the ongoing list of courses on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. The report card will also be sent to the student’s home address.

Program Planning Considerations:

Teachers who are planning a program in this subject will make an effort to take into account considerations for program planning that align with the Ontario Ministry of Education policy and initiatives in a number of important areas.

Course Curriculum

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    Institute of Canadian Education (ICE), Toronto.

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